Bad Day

Wow… I bet you guys are getting sick of my ranting posts. Sorry about that…

But we went out for dinner tonight. Because my day sucked.

Classes went well, but I found out a member of my E-board was not returning for this quarter.

It’s the best thing for her, but it puts a little more on my plate than I’m comfortable with.

Then I lost my wallet.

It just fell out of my jacket pocket when I was walking to lunch. I spent 20 minutes retracing my steps from where I knew I had it to where I realized I didn’t have it.

No good. I called my bank and spent 10 minutes of my lunch break on the phone with them, cancelling that card and getting them to send me a new one.

Turns out a lovely professor in the College of Science had picked it up and was in his office for me to retrieve my wallet.

Which is wonderful. I realize that I am extremely blessed that someone returned it to me with all of the contents still inside, but the amount of stress it caused me was not instantaneously taken away.

I still have limited access to my funds until I recieve the new card from my bank… not the best situation to be in when I have to order books.

Luckily, I have amazing parents who will let me order books with their credit cards until my mess gets straightened out.

I get through my last lab of the day and come straight home. Worked out. Code Boyfriend and I have started a new 30 day challenge a couple days early in order to avoid having one over Christmas.

But more on that later.

I then got into a fight with a very good friend, and was told I was bad at running my club.

And no matter how bad today was, I will get out of bed and do it again tomorrow.

First Day as a TA

I TA’d my first lab today.

A teaching assistant for Tissue Culture. Not where most Bio related TA’s start, but the only subject I’ve ever liked enough to want to spend more time with.

With a full 4 hour lab behind me, I wanted to share what I learned.

1. They’d rather ask you than the professor.

I was really concerned I was going to seem like I didn’t know what I was doing, or no one was going to want to talk to me. Neither happened.

It’s hard to ask a professor a little question, that’s what you’re there for. Be sure to answer the silly little questions when you can.

2. You aren’t the professor.

In my case, a new professor was placed in charge of the lecture since I had taken the class the previous year. Along with the regime change came new lab notebook requirements, lab reports, and even some new experiments I’ve never done.

It’s not my job to know exactly how to do each experiment, that’s the professor’s. It’s less important to know all the details. Just listen to what the professor says and try to answer the questions they have about that. And they will have plenty of questions about exactly what the professor said.

3. You remember more than you think you do.

I took Tissue Culture a full year ago, and with the exception of a couple times at work over the summer, haven’t touched the subject since. I was shocked at how much came rushing back to me as soon as I stepped into that lab.

I remembered where everything was, how to use the inverted microscope, as well as the little tricks I had picked up in my class.

4. They are that much younger than you.

Most students at my school take Tissue Culture as a sophomore. As a senior, I was afraid I wouldn’t have the authority to lead anything, much less a lab setting. As it turns out, those two years make a difference. I stand out, even if it is just because I’m calmer than they are.

I hope these insights into my first day help someone else’s TAing experience.